Songs of the Week

 

A blog where I pick one song to listen to and enjoy, every week! It’s a bit of fun, and a peek into my musical taste and exploration. The point is to discover new music and please give any feedback you would like!

Contact us at Theminor2nd@gmail.com

 

For older Songs of the Week, check out these pages:

Songs of the Week, Early 2016

Songs of the Week, Late 2016

Songs of the Week, Early 2017

 

 

Song of the Week – December 25th, 2017

Darlene Love – “Thanks for Xmas”

So I ran across this cover of an XTC song by Darlene Love, which sounds to good to be true! Merry Xmas everyone.

 

 

Song of the Week – Decemeber 19th, 2017

The Smithereens – “House We Used To Live In”

With Pat Dinizio’s recent death, this song has been stuck in my head. Always the unlikely meeting of AC/DC power chord rock with Big Star’s trademark jangle melodies, The Smithereens were one of the best bands of the late 80’s. This song is a testament to their worthiness and also a reminder to never forget the past and where we come from.

 

 

Blake’s song of the week- 12/12/2017
Tortoise- “Gamera”

i’ve been on a pretty big Tortoise kick of late. This song in particular. Similar to their most famous song, ‘Djed”, this song runs the gamut stylistically. Starting with Fahey-esque guitar picking, the song explodes into go to Tortoise genre staples of krautrock, dub, jazz, and sst inspired punk. A pretty perfect cross section of all the things this incredible band does and does better than nearly anyone. Bonus points for being one of the last songs original second bassist, Bundy K Brown, played on.

 

 

 

 

Blake’s song of the week- 11/25/2017

Lungfish- “Hallucinatorium”

Lungfish is a band i’ve been aware of for a while and owned music by for a while, but they never clicked despite my severe love of aggressively repetitive music. all that changed this week. this is the closing track on The Unanimous Hour and while it’s pretty standard course lungfish for the first half, the second half is what really makes it work. to quote pitchfork’s Aaron Leitko-

“Hallucinatorium” was initially put to tape as a short-winded instrumental, but upon hearing it, Higgs felt inclined to lay down a few verses. The problem: The original recording was too short to accommodate all the ribcages, hexagon faces, and living prayers the singer hoped to mention. Dischord co-founder and Fugazi frontman Ian MacKaye, who guided the recording sessions, suggested simply slowing the tape down in order to buy a few extra minutes– an idea he cribbed from hearing the Prince Far I song “Survival” played back-to-back with its pitched-down instrumental “version.” So instead of picking up steam, the song tumbles into a dubby dream-world. Against the screwed-down sounds, Higgs’ lyrics become deeper and heavier in their resonance.

 

 

Song of the Week – November 19th, 2017

De La Soul – “BreakaDawn”

One thing De La Soul always emphasizes is that the rhythm of their raps being the most important parts. Frequently, the emphasis is placed on an odd syllable and lead MCs PosDnous and TruGoy make sure they are perfectly in sync like no other rap duo before them (but there are plenty after they have influenced). This is probably their greatest song, off of their masterwork Buhloone Mind State. It is music that is truly one of a kind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuNC-u9dzTM

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song of the Week – Nov. 10th, 2017

Gin Blossoms – “Not Only Numb”

One of the more underrated groups of the 1990’s, an era that allowed all sorts of melodic rock groups to thrive. Lead singer Robin Wilson has always been my rock n’ roll doppelganger of sorts, as our voices sound very similar. While this tune is not one of their bigger hits, its the one that pops into my head most days.

 

 

 

SONG OF THE WEEK – Oct. 30th, 2017

The Tragically Hip – “Boots or Hearts”

There have been too many great rock n roll lights extinguished recently. Gordon Downie is only one of them, but he is an important one to me personally as he brought so much joy into my life and broadened my musical horizons. He taught me that lyrics can mean something, and lyrics do not have to be about typical rock stereotypes. The music of the band was always very accessible, as shown on their country rock masterpiece “Boots or Hearts” from way back in 1988. “Fingers and toes / the forty things we share/ 41 if you include / the fact that we dont care.”

 

 

 

Blake’s Song of the Week – Oct. 19th, 2017

Carla Bozulich – “Gonna Stop Killing Today”

Carla has been a person favorite of mine and an influence or probably 15+ years now. Mixing the avant-garde with a taste for classic country, she writes really haunting (and haunting) music filled w/ sadness, righteous fury, and strange power in a way few artists do. This particular song sounds like the Velvet Underground attempting a George Jones cover if that George Jones song was about a sniper having an existential crisis…

 

 

 

Song of the Week – Oct. 10th, 2017

Lisa Germano – “Puppet”

Lisa is a master of lyrics that cut to the bone, and the is one of her more rockin’ tunes. “When I am a Puppet / we get along just fine / you don’t know what I’m thinking / i’m not thinking anything / i used to have a thought or two / but now I only smile.” One of the best songwriters of all time and way too unknown. Let’s correct that wrong, shall we??

 

 

 

Blake’s song of the week 9.25.2017

Boo Dudes “Sarcophagus Rock”

Nashville’s own Boo Dudes release their first lyric video in prep for their new album “Haint Anger” and it drips in ancient truths we sometimes still grapple with. good job, boys!

 

 

 

Song of the Week – Sept. 21st, 2017

Menomena – “Queen Black Acid”

I can’t think of a song that expresses heartache and loss quite as well. Whether they were talking about the dissolve of their band (which happened soon after this) or a painful breakup, Menomena captured something very strong here.

 

 

Song of the Week – Sept. 14th, 2017

Grant Hart – “Green Eyes”

If Husker Du were The Beatles of the 80’s, then Grant Hart was always John Lennon to me. His songs were rarely personal, and always made universal. “she floated Away”, “can you feel it in your soul”, “There is a girl who lived on Heaven Hill”, “You’re a soldier”. This was always my favorite. 56 is way too young to die, but at least he truly got to live.

 

Song of the Week – Sept 03, 2017

Massive Attack – “Teardrop” (w/ Liz Fraser)

if you know, then you already know.

 

 

 

 

Song of the Week – August 21st, 2017

TV on the Radio – “Staring at the Sun”

Happy solar eclipse day!

 

 

 

 

 

Song of the Week – August 9th, 2017

Little Joe Pesci – “Fool on the Hill”

just listen and laugh 😛

 

 

Song of the Week – August 2nd, 2017

Robbie Robertson – “Fallen Angel”

Robertson had his first solo record at the age of 44, but had obviously had a huge career with The Band prior to the 1987 record. On this debut album, recorded with Daniel Lanois, he speaks more highly then ever to his Native American heritage and the results are some huge displays of emotions and some surprisingly high notes!

 

 

Song of the Week – July, 25th 2017

Nation of Ulysses – “50,000 Watts of Goodwill”

There was a time where it was not a bad thing at all to be an overly emotional band, and that time was definitely in the early days of Dischord records with bands like Fugazi, Jawbox, Lungfish, and perhaps the kings of them all: Nation of Ulysses. This is perhaps their most powerful song, an anthem about the pains and excitement of making something that was truly new. The album this song is on was recorded live in 1992 a la Mc5 “Kick out the Jams” and it is as political as it is personal. What else would you expect from a band formed in the heart of Washington D.C.? Youth sound that is intense, intelligent, and powerful.

 

 

 

 

Song of the Week – July 10th, 2017
Jefferson Airplane – “Good Shepherd”

Always one of my favorite Jefferson Airplane tunes, its actually a re-working of a traditional spiritual. The spin they put in on it makes it totally late 1960’s, but also beautiful and timeless. In so many ways, this band embodied togetherness and peace and love like no other band before or sense, and though they could be pretty radical, they were always at their best when preaching love for their fellow men and women.